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Lesson 5.

Desirable Futures

Protection for Now: Protection for Tomorrow

Description:

In this lesson we look at how carefully designed and adequately applied policies and frameworks can have a huge impact on saving the koala. 

Learning Outcomes:

  • Understand that policy and planning can help save the koala
  • Understand that policies and planning frameworks, and the documents that define them, determine who can do what with land on what terms and conditions
  • Understand that policies and planning frameworks differ from state to state and region to region
  • Understand that policies and planning frameworks can be more or less effective
  • Understand that the democratic process allows for people to campaign for the review of policies and planning frameworks

Links to:

HASS

Geography: Social and spatial geography
Civics & Citizenship: Local and State civic processes

English

Plan, draft and publish informative texts including oral presentations​

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Additional Resources:

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Resources for Students:

Primary:

Habitat Loss

Relevant research material for this lesson can be accessed by primary students here

Secondary:

Habitat Loss

Relevant research material for this lesson can be accessed by secondary students here

Recommended Interviews:

Linda Sparrow

President, Bangalow Koalas
Learning Areas:
Civics & Citizenship, Geography
Linda loves koalas, but she’s worried about how many challenges they face. Her way to help was to get together a group of friends and start protecting and planting trees. The idea grew and grew until now they have a big plan to create koala corridors and plant a quarter of a million trees for koalas.

Margot Law

Project Officer
Learning Areas:
Civics & Citizenship, Geography, Science
Margot is the Koala Officer for her Shire Council, which means that she works to convince people to set aside land for wildlife. She talks about trying to conserve koala habitat in perpetuity in the Southern Highlands – that means homes for koalas, forever. To get that right, Margot and her colleagues are mapping how many koalas are where.

John Turbill

Threatened Species Officer
Learning Areas:
Science, Technology, Geography
John Turbill has a different way of finding koalas. To help find koalas, John been working with consultants with specialised koala detection dogs. These dogs are trained to sniff out the scent of koala scat. That means poo. And there’s a lot a scientist can tell from koala poo.

Cheyne Flanagan

Clinical Director, Port Macquarie Koala Hospital
Learning Areas:
Science
Cheyne Flanagan is the Clinical Director of the hospital, and a trained Wildlife Biologist. We talked about what it’s like to try to save koalas from the worst injuries – burns, smoke, disease and road accidents. Cheyne has some suggestions on what students can do to help.

Jim Kinkead

President, Tregeagle Landcare group
Learning Areas:
Civics & Citizenship
Jim is the volunteer President of the Tregeagle Landcare group. Landcare works with other organisations and communities to create koala habitat. They plant trees to join up fragmented habitat into corridors that enable koalas to move around the landscape.

Mark Wilson

Trees Officer, Friends of the Koala
Learning Areas:
Civics & Citizenship, Science
Mark is the Trees Officer with Friends of the Koala, a voluntary group that began 30 years ago to plant habitat trees for koalas. They plant about 50,000 trees in a year and in recent years have set up care facilities for koalas. Mark and I spoke about tree planting and koala carers.
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